Archery: American Kaminski sees silver lining in Rio

2016-08-09 01:32:56

RIO DE JANEIRO When form, motivation or confidence threaten to wane, United States archer Jake Kaminski takes comfort from a two-word reminder inked on the back of his left hand."I am," a simple but open-ended affirmation, is a permanent reminder for the dual silver medalist to believe in himself as he slogs away at the training range or raises his bow for a clutch shot during competition.The 27-year-old took the second of his team silvers at the Rio Olympics on Saturday after the Americans were blown away by an astonishing performance from the South Koreans in the final.Having lost out on gold to Italy in the same event four years ago in London, it was another bitter-sweet day for Kaminski and team mate Brady Ellison who will both compete in the individual events this week.However, Kaminski could at least console himself that the Americans shot well at the Sambodromo against South Korea whereas he and Ellison regretted a golden chance missed in London."The feeling is definitely totally different," the dual Olympian told Reuters."It's a lot better this time around. This time I feel we won the silver as opposed to losing the gold."There really was nothing that any other team in the world could come close to matching. They had the wind or the lack of wind with them." The silver was consolation after a tumultuous period last year for Kaminski, who had to cope with the death of his beloved step-sister from brain cancer and the breakdown of his marriage to a former fellow archer.The twin setbacks made it hard to stay on target at the range and Kaminski was dropped from the national team before winning back his place at Olympic trials.For a discipline requiring calm, stamina and fierce concentration, archers can be intense individuals.Kaminski is among the sport's most passionate exponents, having had his first taste of archery at the age of five when his father gave him a bow won at a gun-club raffle. His silver medal at London helped him build a business out of the sport in his home base in Florida and he developed an app to help archers tune their gear.Few other American archers have the fortune to do what they love full-time, unlike the national team members in ultra-competitive South Korea, who enjoy lavish sponsorship from a local car-maker."Fortunately I do make a living off archery," he said. "I would say that the majority don’t. But even I have to work hard."Kaminski rated his partnership with Ellison and 21-year-old Olympic debutant Zach Garrison the strongest U.S. team he had been a part of in nearly a decade at the top. The three forged a tight bond on the way to the silver.Ironically, they may well end up tearing each other apart in the individual event.Their scores in Friday's ranking round condemned all three to shooting in the same quarter of the draw.Should Kaminski get past local hope Marcus D'Almeida and Ellison beat Libya's Ali Elghrari, the American pair would face off in the second round.Garrett would be a potential third-round match-up."In some aspects it’s a bummer but in others it’s not," said Kaminski."If everything goes well, one of us should be able to get through to the last eight and then there’s a very good chance for the last four and medal contention."There is always a silver lining to everything."

Apple wins dismissal of lawsuit over MacBook logic boards

2016-08-02 07:38:24

Apple Inc won the dismissal on Thursday of a lawsuit accusing it of defrauding consumers by selling MacBook laptop computers that contained "logic boards" it knew were defective, and which routinely failed within two years.U.S. District Judge William Alsup in San Francisco said the plaintiffs, Uriel Marcus and Benedict Verceles, failed to show that Apple made "affirmative misrepresentations," despite citing online complaints and Apple marketing statements calling the laptops "state of the art" or the "most advanced" on the market."Plaintiffs have failed to allege that Apple's logic boards were unfit for their ordinary purposes or lacked a minimal level of quality," Alsup wrote. "Both plaintiffs were able to adequately use their computers for approximately 18 months and two years, respectively."Alsup gave the plaintiffs until Jan. 22 to amend their lawsuit, which sought class-action status, against the Cupertino, California-based company. Omar Rosales, a lawyer for the plaintiffs, did not immediately respond to requests for comment. Apple did not immediately respond to a similar request.The plaintiffs claimed that Apple's sale of MacBooks since May 20, 2010, violated consumer protection laws in California and Texas, where the lawsuit began last May before being moved.They also contended that Apple Chief Executive Tim Cook was told about the defective logic boards in 2011, but did nothing. Logic boards contain computer circuitry and are sometimes known as motherboards.A separate and still pending lawsuit in California accuses Apple of defrauding consumers by selling MacBook Pro laptops in 2011 that contained defective graphic cards, causing screen distortions and system failures. MacBooks are part of Apple's Mac line of desktop and laptop computers. The company reported unit sales in that business of 18.91 million in its latest fiscal year.The case is Marcus et al v. Apple Inc, U.S. District Court, Northern District of California, No. 14-03824. (Reporting by Jonathan Stempel in New York. Editing by Andre Grenon)

Apple wins dismissal of lawsuit over MacBook logic boards

2016-07-26 00:33:29

Apple Inc won the dismissal on Thursday of a lawsuit accusing it of defrauding consumers by selling MacBook laptop computers that contained "logic boards" it knew were defective, and which routinely failed within two years.U.S. District Judge William Alsup in San Francisco said the plaintiffs, Uriel Marcus and Benedict Verceles, failed to show that Apple made "affirmative misrepresentations," despite citing online complaints and Apple marketing statements calling the laptops "state of the art" or the "most advanced" on the market."Plaintiffs have failed to allege that Apple's logic boards were unfit for their ordinary purposes or lacked a minimal level of quality," Alsup wrote. "Both plaintiffs were able to adequately use their computers for approximately 18 months and two years, respectively."Alsup gave the plaintiffs until Jan. 22 to amend their lawsuit, which sought class-action status, against the Cupertino, California-based company. Omar Rosales, a lawyer for the plaintiffs, did not immediately respond to requests for comment. Apple did not immediately respond to a similar request.The plaintiffs claimed that Apple's sale of MacBooks since May 20, 2010, violated consumer protection laws in California and Texas, where the lawsuit began last May before being moved.They also contended that Apple Chief Executive Tim Cook was told about the defective logic boards in 2011, but did nothing. Logic boards contain computer circuitry and are sometimes known as motherboards.A separate and still pending lawsuit in California accuses Apple of defrauding consumers by selling MacBook Pro laptops in 2011 that contained defective graphic cards, causing screen distortions and system failures. MacBooks are part of Apple's Mac line of desktop and laptop computers. The company reported unit sales in that business of 18.91 million in its latest fiscal year.The case is Marcus et al v. Apple Inc, U.S. District Court, Northern District of California, No. 14-03824. (Reporting by Jonathan Stempel in New York. Editing by Andre Grenon)

Apple wins dismissal of lawsuit over MacBook logic boards

2016-07-19 11:49:05

Apple Inc won the dismissal on Thursday of a lawsuit accusing it of defrauding consumers by selling MacBook laptop computers that contained "logic boards" it knew were defective, and which routinely failed within two years.U.S. District Judge William Alsup in San Francisco said the plaintiffs, Uriel Marcus and Benedict Verceles, failed to show that Apple made "affirmative misrepresentations," despite citing online complaints and Apple marketing statements calling the laptops "state of the art" or the "most advanced" on the market."Plaintiffs have failed to allege that Apple's logic boards were unfit for their ordinary purposes or lacked a minimal level of quality," Alsup wrote. "Both plaintiffs were able to adequately use their computers for approximately 18 months and two years, respectively."Alsup gave the plaintiffs until Jan. 22 to amend their lawsuit, which sought class-action status, against the Cupertino, California-based company. Omar Rosales, a lawyer for the plaintiffs, did not immediately respond to requests for comment. Apple did not immediately respond to a similar request.The plaintiffs claimed that Apple's sale of MacBooks since May 20, 2010, violated consumer protection laws in California and Texas, where the lawsuit began last May before being moved.They also contended that Apple Chief Executive Tim Cook was told about the defective logic boards in 2011, but did nothing. Logic boards contain computer circuitry and are sometimes known as motherboards.A separate and still pending lawsuit in California accuses Apple of defrauding consumers by selling MacBook Pro laptops in 2011 that contained defective graphic cards, causing screen distortions and system failures. MacBooks are part of Apple's Mac line of desktop and laptop computers. The company reported unit sales in that business of 18.91 million in its latest fiscal year.The case is Marcus et al v. Apple Inc, U.S. District Court, Northern District of California, No. 14-03824. (Reporting by Jonathan Stempel in New York. Editing by Andre Grenon)

Grammy-winning singer Chaka Khan enters rehab for drug abuse

2016-07-12 03:34:08

LOS ANGELES Grammy-winning singer and songwriter Chaka Khan has postponed all performances for this month after checking herself into a drug addiction rehabilitation program, her representatives said in a message posted on her website.The 63-year-old vocalist has struggled with a dependence on prescription pain medications and has "voluntarily entered the program to get healthy and stay that way," the statement said, though it did not say when or where treatment began.The treatment was described only as "an addiction rehabilitation and aftercare program" that would require her to "postpone all dates scheduled for the month of July.""As part of the ongoing outpatient treatment the doctors have urged her to resume recording mid-July and commence all performances beginning August 1st and onward," according to the statement posted on Sunday. Khan, who first gained fame in the 1970s as the lead female vocalist for the funk band Rufus, launched her solo career with the 1978 smash hit "I'm Every Woman." Her 1984 chart-topping version of the song "I Feel For You," from the hit album of the same name, was written and first recorded by Prince and is widely credited as the first R&B track to feature a rap, which was performed by Grandmaster Melle Mel. Prince, a longtime friend and collaborator with Khan, died in late April from an accidental overdose of the powerful opioid painkiller fentanyl. He was 57. (Reporting by Steve Gorman; Editing by Cynthia Osterman)

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